Tag: evisceration

Traumatic anterior staphyloma

In EnglishI am about to start uploading my pictures collection to the website. Starting from today these posts will randomly reveal interesting pictures from 2014-2017.

First is traumatic anterior staphyloma, male 60 yo. Undergone plain evisceration in December 2015. That time, no implant was used for one or another reason. Note the tape over his left eyebrow. This is meant to caution the nurse and the surgeon to operate on this, and not the other eye. Imagine, the cases of wrongfully amputated eyes are described in the literature!

Traumatic anterior staphyloma, male 60 yo. Undergone plain evisceration. That time, no implant was used. Note the tape over his left eye brow. This is meant to caution the nurse and the surgeon to operate on this, and not the other eye. 03/12/2015.

Traumatic anterior staphyloma

Of note, the golden standard for oculoplastic surgeons in such cases is evisceration with orbital implant. It provides better motility and appearance. See Comparing outcomes of enucleation and evisceration (Ophthalmology, 2006) for reference. Most oculoplastics textbooks would agree. The whole procedure is performed under local anesthesia (retrobulbar lignocaine). Variances of techniques for evisceration are known. The way with posterior incisions in scleral cup and separating optic nerve from the scleral cup are superior, as they provide the surgeon with more space for the bigger PMMA (in this case) orbital implant.

Can eye explode as a result of glaucoma?

In EnglishYes, it can.

Eye basically exploded 2 days ago. And the patient came with painful blind eye and almost absent cornea and contents out. Patient lost his old file number, but we managed to get the history of timolol prescription last year. Which he didn’t use of course – the drops costed $3 and he only had glaucoma. It’s not painful to have glaucoma, so some prefer to live and leave it. Until the eye explodes sometimes.
So he presented with contents out, absent cornea and moderate pain. The management here is controversial regarding which type of amputation to perform (and I am open for private discussions). But in absence of strong tumor suspicion both evisceration and enucleation are valid options.

Glaucoma eye explosion

Glaucoma led to eye explosion